CONDITIONS

DISEASE & MANAGEMENT

Accommodative (Focusing) Dysfunctions

Cataracts

Cornea Cross-Linking

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Convergence Excess (BV Disorder)

Convergence Insufficiency (BV Disorder)

 

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Glaucoma

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Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

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Occupational Therapy

Ocularmotor Dysfunction

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Red Eye

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Trauma

Vision Disorders

Vision Rehabilitation

 

GLAUCOMA

DESCRIPTION

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness that affects more than three million Americans. Glaucoma occurs when then normal pressure inside the eyes (intraocular pressure or IOP) increases because the aqueous humor fluid - which usually flows in and out of the eye - is unable to drain. Over time, this fluid buildup damages the optic nerve, the structure that sends signals from your eyes to your brain. This video gives a general overview of glaucoma.

TYPES OF GLAUCOMA

Open Angle Glaucoma - The more common type of glaucoma. This occurs when the fluid produced inside the eye does not drain properly causing the pressure to rise and damage the main (optic) nerve for vision.

Angle Closure Glaucoma - Less common type of glaucoma. When the drain in the front of the eye becomes occluded, pressure builds up quickly causing a painful episode and permanent loss of vision if not treated promptly. This video explains this type of glaucoma in more detail.

SYMPTOMS

In most cases, glaucoma has no symptoms; by the time an individual experiences decreased vision (typically loss of side vision), the disease is frequently in its latter stages. If you're experiencing any of these symptoms, make an appointment for an eye exam:

• sudden blurred vision

• severe eye pain

• headache

• nausea / vomiting

• rainbow-colored rings or halos around lights

Since early warning signs of glaucoma are rare, it is important to have a comprehensive eye exam every one or two years

RISK FACTORS

• over the age of 60 years old

• are of African, Hispanic, or Asian heritage over the age of 40 years

• family history of glaucoma or elevated eye pressure

• have diabetes or hypertension

• have elevated eye pressure

• steroid users

• have had an eye injury

TYPES OF TESTS

Typically, there is no single test that makes the diagnosis of glaucoma. Diagnosis and classification of glaucoma is based on information from many different tests and findings. 

Tonometry - This test measures the pressure inside your eye

Dilated Eye Exam - Drops are placed in your eyes to widen, or dilate, the pupils. Your doctor will examine your retina and optic nerve for signs of damage and other eye problems.

Visual Field - This test checks for vision loss in your side vision

Optic Coherence Tomography (OCT) - This test allows precise measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer that cannot be visualized by the unaided human eye. This test helps monitor and detect optic nerve loss over time.

Optic Disc Photography - The optic nerve is photographed to document the severity of the damage to the nerve and its used to monitor for changes over time.

Pachymetry - Corneal thickness can influence your eye pressure reading so this test measures the thickness of your cornea.

Gonioscopy - This test looks at the drainage angle in your eye.

TREATMENT

Eye drops, laser, and sometimes surgery are utilized to treat glaucoma

SERVICE AREAS PROVIDING TREATMENT

Primary Eye Care

Rosenbloom Center on Vision and Aging

The Center for Advanced Ophthalmic Care 

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3241 S. Michigan Ave.

Chicago, IL 60616

312.225.6200

OUR HOURS

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8:00 a.m.  -  7:00 p.m.

8:00 a.m.  -  4:30 p.m.

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